Le bf has been making ratatouille almost every week this summer (and now fall) with as many tomatoes, bell peppers, and zucchini as will fit in the Dutch oven — all of it long gone by the next market day.Baked Eggs in RatatouilleServes 2.
1 to 1 1/2 c. ratatouille (le bf’s recipe is here)2 eggsshaved parmesansalt + pepper
Preheat the oven to 400ºF and place two rammekins on a baking sheet. Spoon half to three-fourths of a cup of ratatouille in each, making a small indentation in the middle. Crack an egg on top of each.
If you like, top with some shaved parmesan, salt, and pepper. Bake until the ratatouille is bubbling up and the egg white is opaque and almost (because it keeps cooking out of the oven) completely set, about 12-15 minutes.

Aerial shot by le bf. I wish I could take photos like this but I’m a shortstack (to put it in breakfast terms).

Le bf has been making ratatouille almost every week this summer (and now fall) with as many tomatoes, bell peppers, and zucchini as will fit in the Dutch oven — all of it long gone by the next market day.

Baked Eggs in Ratatouille
Serves 2.

1 to 1 1/2 c. ratatouille (le bf’s recipe is here)
2 eggs
shaved parmesan
salt + pepper

Preheat the oven to 400ºF and place two rammekins on a baking sheet. Spoon half to three-fourths of a cup of ratatouille in each, making a small indentation in the middle. Crack an egg on top of each.

If you like, top with some shaved parmesan, salt, and pepper. Bake until the ratatouille is bubbling up and the egg white is opaque and almost (because it keeps cooking out of the oven) completely set, about 12-15 minutes.

Aerial shot by le bf. I wish I could take photos like this but I’m a shortstack (to put it in breakfast terms).


"What’ll we do with ourselves this afternoon?" cried Daisy, "and the day after that, and the next thirty years?"
"Don’t be morbid," Jordan said. "Life starts all over again when it gets crisp in the fall."

This quote from my favorite character in The Great Gatsby and Ken’s Asian pears remind me that fall is a good thing. Also apples, road trips, concerts (we call this month Rocktober), and Camille’s wedding at the end of the month.
Oh, and anniversary no. 10 for le bf + moi (oh là là)! And butternut squash.
What’s on your fall to do list?

"What’ll we do with ourselves this afternoon?" cried Daisy, "and the day after that, and the next thirty years?"

"Don’t be morbid," Jordan said. "Life starts all over again when it gets crisp in the fall."

This quote from my favorite character in The Great Gatsby and Ken’s Asian pears remind me that fall is a good thing. Also apples, road trips, concerts (we call this month Rocktober), and Camille’s wedding at the end of the month.

Oh, and anniversary no. 10 for le bf + moi (oh là là)! And butternut squash.

What’s on your fall to do list?

Breakfast sandwich of the week: olive oil-fried egg, fresh mozzarella, and overnight thyme + garlic tomatoes, the recipe for which is in the first issue of Kinfolk. I want to have what’s on pages 69-70 next. With my kinfolk, of course.

Breakfast sandwich of the week: olive oil-fried egg, fresh mozzarella, and overnight thyme + garlic tomatoes, the recipe for which is in the first issue of Kinfolk. I want to have what’s on pages 69-70 next. With my kinfolk, of course.

I had a basket of these beauties and the new St. Vincent album on repeat, so I decided to make fig newtons.
Since I was using candy-stripe figs, I wanted to keep things simple. I added barely any sugar, lemon juice, and half a vanilla bean to the naturally jammy fruit. The lemon zest and other half of the vanilla bean went into the pastry.
One bite of the soft, chewy sugar cookie and toothsome caramelized fig together and now they’re the only thing I want to eat. If only the oven had a repeat button.Homemade Fig Newtons(adapted from Ray Garcia, Fig Restaurant via Tasting Table) Makes 27-30 cookies. 
1 c. all-purpose flour1 c. whole wheat pastry flour1/2 tsp. baking soda1/4 tsp. salt1/2 c. unsalted butter, softened1 scant c. of sugar1/2 a vanilla bean (rub the seeds into the sugar) zest of 1/2 a small lemon 1 egg
simple fig jam (or try Fig’s fancy one and tell me how it is)
Mix the flours, baking soda, and salt together in a bowl. In a larger bowl, cream the butter, vanilla sugar, and lemon zest until light and fluffy. Mix in the egg. Add the dry ingredients to the wet in three parts. 
Refrigerate the dough for at least 30 minutes. Preheat oven to 350ºF. Roll out the dough on parchment paper and trim to a rectangle about 16” x 12” in size, about 1/8” thick. Cut into three long strips. (I used a ruler.)
Spoon the jam down the middle of each strip. Fold the dough on either side over the jam so that it slightly overlaps. Gently roll the finished log over so that the seam faces down.
Now, you can bake the logs whole, but being a fan of chewy jam edges, I cut mine into bars before baking. Bake for about 15-20 minutes in the oven, until light golden brown.

I had a basket of these beauties and the new St. Vincent album on repeat, so I decided to make fig newtons.

Since I was using candy-stripe figs, I wanted to keep things simple. I added barely any sugar, lemon juice, and half a vanilla bean to the naturally jammy fruit. The lemon zest and other half of the vanilla bean went into the pastry.

One bite of the soft, chewy sugar cookie and toothsome caramelized fig together and now they’re the only thing I want to eat. If only the oven had a repeat button.

Homemade Fig Newtons
(adapted from Ray Garcia, Fig Restaurant via Tasting Table
Makes 27-30 cookies. 

1 c. all-purpose flour
1 c. whole wheat pastry flour
1/2 tsp. baking soda
1/4 tsp. salt
1/2 c. unsalted butter, softened
1 scant c. of sugar
1/2 a vanilla bean (rub the seeds into the sugar) 
zest of 1/2 a small lemon 
1 egg

simple fig jam (or try Fig’s fancy one and tell me how it is)

Mix the flours, baking soda, and salt together in a bowl. In a larger bowl, cream the butter, vanilla sugar, and lemon zest until light and fluffy. Mix in the egg. Add the dry ingredients to the wet in three parts. 

Refrigerate the dough for at least 30 minutes. Preheat oven to 350ºF. Roll out the dough on parchment paper and trim to a rectangle about 16” x 12” in size, about 1/8” thick. Cut into three long strips. (I used a ruler.)

Spoon the jam down the middle of each strip. Fold the dough on either side over the jam so that it slightly overlaps. Gently roll the finished log over so that the seam faces down.

Now, you can bake the logs whole, but being a fan of chewy jam edges, I cut mine into bars before baking. Bake for about 15-20 minutes in the oven, until light golden brown.

I found myself eating spoonfuls of this jam out of the pot. The rest never even made it into a jar. You’ll see why next.Simple Fig JamMakes about one cup.
8 oz. fresh figs (about 7 figs)1/4 c. turbinado sugarthe juice of 1/2 a small lemon1/2 a vanilla bean
Slice the tops off the figs and quarter them. Combine the figs, sugar, lemon juice, vanilla bean scrapings and pod in a pot over medium heat and bring to a boil. Keep stirring and lightly mashing the fruit until thickened. 

I put the used vanilla bean in our coffee. 

I found myself eating spoonfuls of this jam out of the pot. The rest never even made it into a jar. You’ll see why next.

Simple Fig Jam
Makes about one cup.

8 oz. fresh figs (about 7 figs)
1/4 c. turbinado sugar
the juice of 1/2 a small lemon
1/2 a vanilla bean

Slice the tops off the figs and quarter them. Combine the figs, sugar, lemon juice, vanilla bean scrapings and pod in a pot over medium heat and bring to a boil. Keep stirring and lightly mashing the fruit until thickened. 

I put the used vanilla bean in our coffee. 

The Gravenstein is an endangered species of apple that grows here on the West Coast in Sebastopol, CA. Its striking looks, crisp, sweet-tart flavor, and late summer season make it quite the herald apple.
I made this for Labor Day. It seemed appropriate, a crostata being less work than a pie. You can bake this and get back to enjoying the summer, which I’m hoping sticks around for a while. Gravenstein apples, too.Apple Cheddar Crostata(adapted from Food & Wine)Makes one 10-12” tart.
Crust:1 1/4 c. all-purpose flour (I used half whole wheat pastry flour)1 TB sugar1/2 tsp. salt1/2 c. very cold unsalted butter, cubed1/2 c. shredded white cheddar cheese1/2 c. buttermilk or ice water
Filling:3 apples, peeled + cut into 1/4” slices1/4 to 1/2 c. sugar (taste the apples)2 TB lemon juice1 TB flour 1 TB butter, cut into small pieces 
Since the ingredients and amounts were about the same, I used my go-to pie crust and just added in the cheddar. I love the combination of the creamy, nutty pastry and the sweet, roasted apple filling.  
To make the crust, pulse the flour, sugar, and salt in a food processor. Add the butter and cheese and pulse on/off until a coarse meal forms. Pour in the buttermilk or ice water and pulse on/off just until the mixture begins to clump. 
Form the dough into a disk, wrap in plastic, and refrigerate at least 1 hour or overnight. Preheat oven to 375ºF and line a baking sheet with parchment paper. Mix the apples, 1/4 c. sugar, lemon juice, and 1 TB of flour in a bowl. 
Roll the chilled dough out to about a 13” circle. (I did this directly on the lined baking sheet.) Leaving a 2” border, arrange the apple slices in the middle of the dough. Dot with the butter and sprinkle a little more sugar on top.
Bake for about an hour, until crust is golden brown and apples are bubbly and very tender. If necessary, cover with foil to prevent burning. Delicious warm or cold. 

The Gravenstein is an endangered species of apple that grows here on the West Coast in Sebastopol, CA. Its striking looks, crisp, sweet-tart flavor, and late summer season make it quite the herald apple.

I made this for Labor Day. It seemed appropriate, a crostata being less work than a pie. You can bake this and get back to enjoying the summer, which I’m hoping sticks around for a while. Gravenstein apples, too.

Apple Cheddar Crostata
(adapted from Food & Wine)
Makes one 10-12” tart.

Crust:
1 1/4 c. all-purpose flour (I used half whole wheat pastry flour)
1 TB sugar
1/2 tsp. salt
1/2 c. very cold unsalted butter, cubed
1/2 c. shredded white cheddar cheese
1/2 c. buttermilk or ice water

Filling:
3 apples, peeled + cut into 1/4” slices
1/4 to 1/2 c. sugar (taste the apples)
2 TB lemon juice
1 TB flour 
1 TB butter, cut into small pieces 

Since the ingredients and amounts were about the same, I used my go-to pie crust and just added in the cheddar. I love the combination of the creamy, nutty pastry and the sweet, roasted apple filling.  

To make the crust, pulse the flour, sugar, and salt in a food processor. Add the butter and cheese and pulse on/off until a coarse meal forms. Pour in the buttermilk or ice water and pulse on/off just until the mixture begins to clump. 

Form the dough into a disk, wrap in plastic, and refrigerate at least 1 hour or overnight. Preheat oven to 375ºF and line a baking sheet with parchment paper. Mix the apples, 1/4 c. sugar, lemon juice, and 1 TB of flour in a bowl. 

Roll the chilled dough out to about a 13” circle. (I did this directly on the lined baking sheet.) Leaving a 2” border, arrange the apple slices in the middle of the dough. Dot with the butter and sprinkle a little more sugar on top.

Bake for about an hour, until crust is golden brown and apples are bubbly and very tender. If necessary, cover with foil to prevent burning. Delicious warm or cold. 

I was so happy to be seeing le bf’s family back from France, back at their house in Orange County, I made cupcakes. (I never make cupcakes.) We ate them poolside, after le barbecue.
I’ve made Clementine’s banana cake before, but Luisa of The Wednesday Chef just made it better with some tweaks to the frosting. My take on the cake has half whole wheat flour and 1/3 cup less sugar.
Half the recipe makes a dozen cupcakes and 1 mini-loaf. Luisa also said not to eat this cake for breakfast, so let’s just say we ate the leftovers before lunch.

I was so happy to be seeing le bf’s family back from France, back at their house in Orange County, I made cupcakes. (I never make cupcakes.) We ate them poolside, after le barbecue.

I’ve made Clementine’s banana cake before, but Luisa of The Wednesday Chef just made it better with some tweaks to the frosting. My take on the cake has half whole wheat flour and 1/3 cup less sugar.

Half the recipe makes a dozen cupcakes and 1 mini-loaf. Luisa also said not to eat this cake for breakfast, so let’s just say we ate the leftovers before lunch.

My treat for you this weekend: figs that look and taste like candy. They were two for $1 from the Capay Organic stand at the farmers market.  

My treat for you this weekend: figs that look and taste like candy. They were two for $1 from the Capay Organic stand at the farmers market.  

They make a blended coffee, chocolate, banana, and cinnamon drink like this at the Gypsy Den in Costa Mesa, CA. I lived next door in college, in an off-campus apartment. My roommates were three of the coolest girls I (still) know.
One of them is getting married(!) in October. The tomboy girl drummer science major, of course. 
I’m definitely going to need one of these before trying on any bridesmaid dresses.Banana Mochas(just like at the Gypsy Den)Serves two.
1.5 bananas, broken into chunks, frozen1 c. milk8 oz. ice2-3 tsp. espresso powder2-3 TB chocolate sauce (see below)2 big shakes of cinnamon
If you have an espresso machine (lucky!), I’m guessing it’s 2 shots per drink. Combine ingredients in a blender. Blend, shake, repeat until thick and creamy. If it’s too thick, add a little more milk.Basic Chocolate Sauce(adapted from David Lebovitz)Makes about 2 cups.
1 c. water3/4 c. agave or honey3/4 c. cocoa powder2 oz. semisweet or bittersweet chocolate, choppeda pinch of salt
Note: The original recipe calls for 1/2 a cup of sugar and 1/2 a cup of liquid sweetener, but for blended coffee drink purposes, I make mine with just the agave or honey. (In other words, too much sugar + caffeine makes me crazy.)
Whisk the water, sugar, honey or agave, cocoa powder, and salt together in a pot set over medium heat. Bring just to a boil. Remove from heat, stir in the chocolate. Let stand until room temperature (the sauce will thicken).

They make a blended coffee, chocolate, banana, and cinnamon drink like this at the Gypsy Den in Costa Mesa, CA. I lived next door in college, in an off-campus apartment. My roommates were three of the coolest girls I (still) know.

One of them is getting married(!) in October. The tomboy girl drummer science major, of course. 

I’m definitely going to need one of these before trying on any bridesmaid dresses.

Banana Mochas
(just like at the Gypsy Den)
Serves two.

1.5 bananas, broken into chunks, frozen
1 c. milk
8 oz. ice
2-3 tsp. espresso powder
2-3 TB chocolate sauce (see below)
2 big shakes of cinnamon

If you have an espresso machine (lucky!), I’m guessing it’s 2 shots per drink. Combine ingredients in a blender. Blend, shake, repeat until thick and creamy. If it’s too thick, add a little more milk.

Basic Chocolate Sauce
(adapted from David Lebovitz)
Makes about 2 cups.

1 c. water
3/4 c. agave or honey
3/4 c. cocoa powder
2 oz. semisweet or bittersweet chocolate, chopped
a pinch of salt

Note: The original recipe calls for 1/2 a cup of sugar and 1/2 a cup of liquid sweetener, but for blended coffee drink purposes, I make mine with just the agave or honey. (In other words, too much sugar + caffeine makes me crazy.)

Whisk the water, sugar, honey or agave, cocoa powder, and salt together in a pot set over medium heat. Bring just to a boil. Remove from heat, stir in the chocolate. Let stand until room temperature (the sauce will thicken).

The recipe for this lazy summer day scramble comes from one of my favorite cookbooks, Vegetarian Suppers by Deborah Madison. I add a little garlic to make it a little more savory, and avocado, you know why.Fresh Corn Scramble with Smoked Mozzarella + Basil(adapted from Deborah Madison via The Star Tribune)Serves 2.
1 ear of corn, unhusked2 cloves of garlic, minced (optional)4 fresh basil leaves, slivered1 oz. smoked mozzarella, grated3 eggs
Roast the corn directly on a gas burner set to a medium flame. Use tongs to turn it. (Be careful.) Alternately, you can simmer the raw kernels in a few tablespoons of water for a few minutes, then drain.
Whisk the cheese, eggs, a little salt and pepper together in a bowl. Heat a pan over medium heat. When it’s nice and hot, add a little butter or olive oil, then the garlic, corn, and basil. Season with salt and pepper.
Pour in the egg mixture. Using a spatula, keep gently folding everything together until set. Divide between two plates, top with avocado, and enjoy.

The recipe for this lazy summer day scramble comes from one of my favorite cookbooks, Vegetarian Suppers by Deborah Madison. I add a little garlic to make it a little more savory, and avocado, you know why.

Fresh Corn Scramble with Smoked Mozzarella + Basil
(adapted from Deborah Madison via The Star Tribune)
Serves 2.

1 ear of corn, unhusked
2 cloves of garlic, minced (optional)
4 fresh basil leaves, slivered
1 oz. smoked mozzarella, grated
3 eggs

Roast the corn directly on a gas burner set to a medium flame. Use tongs to turn it. (Be careful.) Alternately, you can simmer the raw kernels in a few tablespoons of water for a few minutes, then drain.

Whisk the cheese, eggs, a little salt and pepper together in a bowl. Heat a pan over medium heat. When it’s nice and hot, add a little butter or olive oil, then the garlic, corn, and basil. Season with salt and pepper.

Pour in the egg mixture. Using a spatula, keep gently folding everything together until set. Divide between two plates, top with avocado, and enjoy.

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xo breakfast